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Could Be Hall of Famers

Here is a list of great Negro League Players who could be considered for the Hall of Fame. The information is from "The Biographical Encyclopedia of the Negro Baseball Leagues" by James A. Riley

 

Biz Mackey

Mainly a catcher and later a manager, lifetime .335 average (.326 average in exhibition against major leaguers), three successive Eastern Colored League pennants with the Hilldale Daisies ('23-'25), 1925 Negro World Series (only ECL team to do so), 1934 Negro National League pennant with the Philadelphia Stars, 1946 Negro World Series as a player-manager with the Newark Eagles. Also managed Roy Campanella (HOF) while with the Baltimore Elite Giants, who states that Mackey taught him how to catch.

 

Pete Hill

mainly in the outfield and later managed, .326 lifetime (.354 against major leaguers), hit .428 for the Leland Giants that were 106-7 in 1910, hit safely in 115 of 116 games in 1911, never won a pennant in his 27 year career. Always compared to Ty Cobb.

 

Cristobal Torriente

outfield, .333 in the Negro Leagues and .352 in Cuba, three consecutive Negro National League pennants with the Chicago American Giants ('20-'22), played from 1913-1928 and only batted under .300 twice, .313 against major leaguers (including a series where he was matched against Babe Ruth--he hit .378 with 3 HR, where Ruth hit .345 with 2 HR). One of the original ten players elected to the Cuban HOF.

 

Jud Wilson

infield, .345 lifetime (.372 in Cuba, and .442 against major leaguers), four championships in six years with four different teams (1929 with the Baltimore Black Sox, 1931 with the Homestead Grays, 1932 with the Pittsburgh Crawfords, and 1934 with the Philadelphia Stars), played in the East-West All-Star game in 1933-1935 and was player-manager in 1937, won the Negro National League pennant every year with the Homestead Grays from 1940-1945. He was also from Foggy Bottom.

 

Louis Santop

catcher, lifetime .406 hitter, part of the pennant-winning Hilldale Daisies (1923-1925), known for his tape measure home runs (credited with a 500+ ft HR). Regarded as the biggest draw in the Negro Leagues in his prime. He was also a catcher for Smokey Joe Williams and Cannonball Dick Redding.

 

Mule Suttles

1b and lf, gained his nickname for the way he would “kick” a ball out of the park, .338 lifetime (.374 against major leaguers), five time All-Star, hit .432 with 26 HR and a 1.000 slugging % in 1926, also known for tape-measure homers, won championships with the St. Louis Stars in 1928, 1930, and 1931 (the last pennant in the Negro National League).

 

Willard Brown

centerfield, .355 lifetime in the Negro Leagues, but played 21 games for the St. Louis Browns in 1947 for an average of .179 with 1 HR—the first ever hit in the American League by a black player (he had a .371 lifetime before his brief play in MLB), played for the Kansas City Monarchs from 1937 to 1942 winning the Negro American League pennant five out of six years, l946 Negro American League pennant with the Monarchs, two time All-Star.

 

Cannonball Dick Redding

pitcher from 1911-1938, gained his nickname for his fastball, credited with 30 no-hitters throughout his career, won 17 straight games as a rookie, during a game in 1912 for the New York Lincoln Giants he only faced 27 batters and striking out 25 of them, won 20 straight games in 1915 for the New York Lincoln Stars before his first loss. Known for his stamina, it was rare for him not to finish a game.

 

Spot Poles

centerfield, called the “Black Ty Cobb,” won the 1913 championship with the New York Lincoln Giants, .400+ hitter in the Negro Leagues, .319 in Cuba, .594 against major leaguers. Served his country with distinction in WWI (five battle stars and a Purple Heart), and buried at Arlington National Cemetery.

 

Newt Allen

2b, spent the majority of his 23 year career (1922-1944) with the Kansas City Monarchs, four time All-Star, 1923-1925 and 1929 Negro National League pennants with the Monarchs, 1924 World Series, had several Golden Glove performances, won the last Negro National League pennant with the St. Louis Stars in 1931, won five of the first six Negro American League pennants with the Monarchs (1937, 1939-1942), .296 lifetime, .301 against major leaguers, .278 in Cuba. He played in the first World Series between the ECL and the old NNL, as well as the first World Series between the NAL and the new NNL. After he retired, he participated in the Democratic Party in Kansas City.

 

Ben Taylor

1b, a .334 lifetime average and a .500 average in his one Cuban season, started as a pitcher for the Birmingham Giants with a record of 22-3 in 1909 and pitched 30-1 for the St. Louis Giants in 1911, hit .333 as cleanup in his first year with the Indianapolis ABCs, played many years as a player-manager. Later umpired in 1932 and 1934. Also managed Buck Leonard (HOF) in 1933.

 

John Beckwith
ss, 3b, c, won the Negro National League pennant with the Chicago American Giants in 1922, .419 in 1921 with the Chicago Giants (different team), .402 in 1925 with the Baltimore Black Sox, .443 in 1929 for the Homestead Grays, .480 in 1930 with the New York Lincoln Giants, 54 HR in 1928. At the end of his career, he had a .366 lifetime average with a .337 average against major leaguers.

 

Ray Brown

pitcher, two time All-Star, 3-2 in World Series play for the Homestead Grays from 1942-1945, 18-3, 2.53 ERA in 1940, and 10-4, 2.72 ERA in 1941, perfect in a seven inning game against the Chicago American Giants in 1945, won 28 straight games between the 1936-1937 seasons, posted a 10-2 record in 1938 and one of the five players the Pittsburgh Courier labeled as certain major league stars (the others being Josh Gibson, Buck Leonard, Cool Papa Bell, and Satchel Paige—and all in the HOF; the newspaper also stated that the Pittsburgh Pirates should sign them if they wanted to guarantee the National League pennant), won the Negro National League pennant with the Homestead Grays in 1939, 1940, and 1942-1945, as well as the World Series 1943-1944. A 46-20 lifetime record in Cuba while batting .266. His first year in Puerto Rico, he was 12-4 with a 1.82 ERA—he had an ERA of 1.05 six years later. In Mexico from 1946-1949: 13-9 with a 3.52 ERA, 10-12 with a 3.24 ERA, 13-4 with a 3.53 ERA, and 15-11 with a 3.40 ERA. Played in Canada from 1950-1951 and won the 1951 Canadian Provincial League championship with Shebrooke, where he went 11-10 on the year.

 

Bingo DeMoss

considered the greatest second baseman in the Negro Leagues for the first twenty five years, hit .316 with 34 SB in 50 games in 1915, won the 1916 Western championship with the Indianapolis ABCs, hit .258 with 24 SB in 51 games for the Chicago American Giants that is regarded as the best “deadball” era team ever, .316 in 1919, .303 in 1926, and .314 in 1929, and .333 his one winter in Cuba. He is known more for his defensive play, but also productive with a bat.

 

Wild Bill Wright

outfield, switch-hitter, played his entire US career (1932-1945) with the Elite Giants even though they moved from Nashville to Columbus to Washington to Baltimore, selected to the East-West All-Stars team seven times (1935-1939, 1942, 1945) where he hit .318 in All-Star competition, hit .410 in 1937 and .488 in 1939 where he was awarded the batting title for the year, won a hard fought Triple Crown in 1943, lifetime Negro Leagues average of .361 and hit .371 against major leaguers. Later became wildly popular in Mexico, and elected to the Mexican HOF.

 

Sammy T. Hughes
according to Riley, “the premier second baseman of the Negro National League” (400), hit .355, .353, .319, .302, .345, and .254 from 1935-1940, selected more times to the East-West All-Star team more than any other second baseman during his sixteen year career (1931-1946) and hit .263, had a tryout with the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1942, .296 lifetime average with a .353 average against major leaguers.

 

Oliver Marcelle

3b, known for his defensive plays, won the Eastern Colored League pennants with the Atlantic City Bacharach Giants in 1926-1927, won the American Negro League pennant with the Baltimore Black Sox in 1929 were he hit .288, he also hit from 1921-1928: .305, .364, .295, .343, .308, .255, .306, and .296. He had a lifetime average of .305 in the Negro Leagues, .305 in Cuba, and .333 against major leaguers. One of his sons also played in the Negro Leagues (Everett Marcel), and eventually entered the majors.

 

Bill Byrd
pitcher, had a .600 winning percentage (114-72) from 1932-1949 with only one losing season (1946), credited with a 20-7 record in 1936, six time All-Star (1936, 1939, 1941, 1944-1946). Also a respectable hitter with averages of .318 in 1936, .286 in 1941, .304 in 1942, and .344 in 1948.

 

"Home Run" Johnson
ss, oldest player on the list (career: 1895-1916), gained his nickname for hitting 60 HR for a semipro team (Findlay Slugger) in 1894, batted .471 in his rookie Negro League season (1895) for the Page Fence Giants whose record was 118-36, won the Eastern championship with the Cuban X-Giants in 1903, won two consecutive Eastern championships with the Philadelphia Giants in 1905-1906, won the Eastern championship with the Brooklyn Royal Giants in 1909, first American to win a batting title in Cuba (.319 average in Cuba), .293 average against major leaguers (hit .412 in an 1910 exhibition against the Detroit Tigers—outhitting both Ty Cobb and Sam Crawford).

 

Dick Lundy
ss, switch-hitter, averages for 1921-1929: .484, .335, .310, .363, .273, .347, .341, .409, and .336, two successive Eastern Colored League pennants with the Atlantic City Bacharach Giants as a player-manager ('26-'27), play-managed the Baltimore Black Sox to the American Negro League pennant in 1929, played in the East-West All-Star game in 1933 and 1934, 1935 second half title with the New York Cubans, .330 lifetime, .341 in Cuba, and .344 against major leaguers. Managed Ray Dandridge and Willie Wells (both in the HOF), considered the best Negro League shortstop in the '20s, and labeled as "the greatest shortstop to ever live" by Honus Wagner.

 

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